table of contents

  • Health Alliance Slip-Ups Costly

    Health Alliance Slip-Ups Costly   Byline: Jim McElhatton, THE WASHINGTON TIMES The failure of D.C. Healthcare Alliance officials to perform routine eligibility checks of people enrolled in a city-funded health plan has cost D.C. taxpayers millions of dollars since 2002, a recent audit found. The city’s Healthcare Alliance program paid out $13 million in 2002 and 2003 for health services to residents already eligible for Medicaid, according to a finding of the D.C.-based accounting firm KPMG LLP. Auditors forwarded the findings to the D.C. Office of Chief Financial Officer on Jan. 22. “The Alliance did not perform Medicaid eligibility verifications, and the District’s monitoring of the Alliance’s invoices did not detect this,” the audit said. The D.C. Department of Health oversees the city-funded health care plan for low-income residents who do not qualify for Medicaid – the federal government’s health care program for low-income people….

    October 4, 2019

  • Wellbeing Sector Jobs Expected to Grow, WVU Report Finds

    Nuzum, Lydia, Charleston Gazette Mail Social insurance part employments in…

    October 4, 2019

  • School-Based Health Centers Help

    Ferrell, Sherri, The Charleston Gazette (Charleston, WV)   February is National School-Based Health Care Awareness Month. Without receiving much attention, the integration of school-based health centers into West Virginia schools over the last decade has proven extremely effective. By providing easy access to basic – but often absent – health care services, more students are showing up to class healthy and ready to learn. Healthier children make better students, which is a fundamental mission of these centers….

    October 4, 2019

  • Health Consolidation Begins Today

    Lett, Dan, Winnipeg Free Press   It’s one of the single biggest days of change for health care in Manitoba, although nobody using the system will likely notce a difference. Starting today, more than 12,000 people who work within Manitoba’s health-care system will begin a six-week process that will result in them changing employers. Employees of dozens of disparate offices, agencies and facilities now work for Shared Health, the province’s new central agency for the planning and delivery of health services. Announced in 2018 with much fanfare, Shared Health has been busy assuming administrative responsibility for a number of key health services, including Winnipeg ambulance and diagnostic imaging….

    October 4, 2019

  • Health Care Targets: Affordable Prescriptions, Public Insurance

    Hoffman, Christopher, New Haven Register (New Haven, CT)   Although Gov. Ned Lamont said nothing about health care policy in his inaugural speech to the General Assembly, it’s likely to be a major theme of at least his early months in office….

    October 4, 2019

  • Health Right Shows How to Do Needle Exchange

    Health Right Shows How to Do Needle Exchange   Unlike KCHD, non-profit health provider runs a smooth program…

    October 4, 2019